Marifran Korb

Tag: reiki

My Relationship with Cancer, Part 17

by on Nov.12, 2015, under Overcoming Cancer

It’s now been five and a half years since I was diagnosed. A ‘long and windy’ road for sure. It’s risky doing it my way. I could lose, and lose big.

My choice is not something I advocate for anyone else. The traditional route could kill me as well as the non-traditional. People takes sides. I’m only sharing my choices and reasons that apply to no one else. Had I had surgery as was advised, I truly think I would not be here today. Now I have lived beyond the five-year cancer success date. And I’ve lived happily and passionately, knowing that each day is a gift. Some things I’ve learned is that I must focus on what uplifts me, and what keeps me going. I’m no longer willing to keep people in my life that do not value me.

Yet, living five and a half years is not enough for me. Looking ahead, I still don’t know what will completely turn the ship around. Not for a minute can I be sure what kept the tumor from going to stage two, despite the fact that the tumor is close to the ureter and the blood supply.

Last December, the CT scan showed that the tumor had grown for the 4th year. It was stage one, but any larger and it would be stage 2, whether it spread to other organs or not. This was my last year to get it under control on my own. If it grew, I’d be in deeper trouble.

To make matters worse, reluctantly I had to forego Low Dose Naltrexone, a prescription drug. It was getting harder to obtain. Though it may have kept the tumor from growing a lot, after 2 1/2 years of use, it had not stopped the continual growth.

So, with lots of research, I decided to try Artemisinin, a drug that is easy to acquire on Amazon without a prescription. With constant research in books and on web, I know what I’ll do and won’t do. Consistently, I receive and practice Reiki. Yoga, Tai-Chi and Qigong also are frequent practices. Continually, I meditate and exercise. Daily I eat well, take supplements, and have fun. I appreciate every morsel of life.

Last Monday, I had a CT scan. From the CD of the scan, I saw that the tumor looked a tiny bit smaller. Next day, I picked up the radiology report. The tumor is 1 mm smaller on one side and 4 mm smaller on another side. Though it is not all I had hoped for, I am relieved and encouraged.

However, the report refers to the tumor as basically the same size, despite the numbers. Evidently, it’s not an important distinction for the medical field. It is for me, though. For the first time, it has shrunk rather than grown!! It’s the same size it was two years ago.

What put a damper on the excitement was the scary words: “it may have metastasized.” The report said that it may have metastasized to my left lung since there is a new nodule there. After studying past chest scan reports, I realize that this is a new nodule on my lungs. Yet, what I recognize is that my lungs have had other nodules that have disappeared. Each one has been in a different part of my lungs. So I am not going to worry. This new one can disappear, too.

If the new spot means stage 2 cancer, then it will be a difficult game changer. I declare the smaller size kidney tumor is a healthy game changer.

To me this is a success. This gives me hope the tumor will continue to downsize in my kidney, and in my life.

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My Relationship With Cancer, Part 16

by on Oct.21, 2014, under Overcoming Cancer

Huge things have been occurring. Since my lungs are a risk factor in any surgery that may be necessary, I am doing what I can to heal without it. Primarily, I have been enjoying life, receiving reiki and practicing meditation. Besides, I use Low Dose Naltrexone and take many supplements.

When I made an appointment with another urologist, I asked if she did partial or complete nephrectomies. There is no way of telling from internet information. The nurse I spoke with me assured me that this doctor does both. I needed to ask since one urologist, Dr. B, kept me going to see him for two years before admitting that he “was not allowed to do complete nephrectomies (cutting out the whole kidney), only partials.” Due to the location of the tumor, I knew from the start that I am not a candidate for partial, meaning taking only the tumor and leaving the rest of the kidney.

After six weeks of waiting for this appointment, today I saw urologist Dr. R. She told me she does neither type of nephrectomies. Happily, she stated that the doctor in her group who does complete neprectomies is Dr K, who happens to be the first urologist I saw four and a half years ago. He is the one who told me it was necessary to have surgery immediately. He told me the date he had schedule my surgery, without consulting me.

Meanwhile, Dr. R said my only option was surgery, despite my risks. There was no discussion of surgery benefits vs. risks, so I mentioned a few risks I knew. 1) For healthy people there’s only an 87% chance of surviving and 13% chance of not surviving. There’s a very good chance my 38% capacity lungs will not withstand the three-hour operation. 2) Most people in otherwise good health who get complete nephrectomies due to cancer will die within ten years. This is due to increased risk of cardiovascular health. My heart is already compromised by my lungs.

When I stated this, Dr. R acknowledged that it was true, treating these as insignificant details. She clearly expected me to go to Dr. K for surgery.
My response was: “If I wanted to see Dr K, I would have made an appointment with him. I would have said yes four and a half years ago.”

In Cincinnati, it appears the urologists are in three groups: The Urology Group, the UC Group and the Christ Hospital Group. I have been to at least one doctor in each group. So I came home and made an appointment with yet another urologist. The earliest appointment is over a month away. In case I have to resort to surgery as my last option, I got assurances that this new doctor does complete nephrectomies. Wish me luck.

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